Author: sefariaproject

Educator Spotlight: How a Blizzard Brought Sefaria to Miami

Chani Richmond, a middle school teacher at Hebrew Academy RASG in Miami Beach, Florida, is one of twelve partner educators in Sefaria’s 2017-2018 School Partnership Initiative. An educator with 20 years of experience, Chani has spent that time exploring new educational technologies and experimenting with bringing innovations happening in general studies classrooms across the country into her Judaic Studies classroom. She credits a 2008 blizzard and the resulting Google slides presentation that she and her students worked on remotely together as her aha moment in which she came to truly understand the potential of collaborative online learning.

Share your source sheets

Now, when you’re ready to “share” your source sheet, you have the option to write a summary to help others understand what you’re teaching or the discussion you’re leading. You’ll also be prompted to add topical tags to make your sheet more searchable.   See this new feature below on a source sheet that explores how and when we can properly express our gratitude through three biblical stories.  

Assistive Technology on Sefaria

Six months ago, we gave ourselves a public deadline promising to complete serious improvements to our site’s accessibility. Since then, our engineering team has been hard at work to live up to that promise. As the engineer primarily tasked with making that promise a reality, I wanted to share our update with you. We’ve been rolling out incremental updates to the site over the past several months, and today I’m proud to announce that users who access Sefaria with the help of assistive technologies can now enjoy a comparable experience throughout the site to those who do so without using them.

Sefaria for the Visually Impaired

Sefaria is all about making the texts of the Jewish tradition accessible to everybody. So far we’ve been accomplishing this by making texts and translations available on our website, in our mobile apps, and as data that people can download in a variety of formats. But could a blind or visually impaired person access these resources? Unfortunately, until recently, most of us on the Sefaria team hadn’t spent enough time thinking about this question.